Poetry and Nature: Robert Burns’ “Tim’rous Beastie”

In keeping with month’s theme, Poetry and Nature, I wanted to turn back to Robert Burns’ “To a Mouse,” a poem that delights and provokes upon each reread. In the poem we can see Burns’ tendency to find inspiration in the everyday; a brief encounter with nature gives him the opportunity to ruminate on the state of man and mouse alike. 

FSU’s Special Collections holds an incredible number of volumes of Robert Burns poetry, as well as ephemera connected to Burns fandom. A simple search for “Robert Burns” in the catalog of Special Collections items returns 149 items, including plays, music, biographies, and pamphlets, and most of these are either in the Shaw or Scottish collections.

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The Kilmarnock Burns, opened to “To a Mouse”

Likely our rarest item is our copy of the Kilmarnock Burns, the earliest printing of a collection of Burns’ works; 612 copies were printed in 1786 on a subscription basis, and was immediately successful, turning Robert Burns into a national celebrity. It is in this volume that “To a Mouse” was first printed for public consumption. Here’s a video of Dawn Steele performing the work:

We learn in the poem’s subtitle, and in the lore surrounding its inception, that the titular “Mouse” was glimpsed, “On Turning up in Her Nest with the Plough, November, 1785.”

Burns laments this action, expressing dismay that he’s caused her tiny mouse-heart to race: “O, what a pannic’s in thy breastie!” Upon the poem’s closing, however, Burns has considered the differences between himself and the “wee beastie”: while both mice and men experience the roughness and instability in life, the mouse has the advantage in not being able to either dwell on the past or anxiously anticipate the future. 

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You can visit the Kilmarnock Burns, along with other Burnsiana, in the Special Collections exhibit “‘In His Great Shadow’: Robert Burns’ Legacy.”

Spring is here, and FSU’s campus is covered in blossoming trees, lush green leaves, and curious critters. Take some time this week to consider your relationship to the natural world around you. Do you notice the little things on your walks through campus? Do you allow, as Burns did, these external stimuli to impact your thoughts and feelings about yourself, or even to provoke poetic expression?

Bad Children of History #34: French Rascals

Today’s gallic ungovernables come from a 1930 edition of the classic Les Malheurs de Sophie, with color illustrations by Jacques Touchet.

For those unfamiliar with the story, Sophie is an adventurous little girl who lives in a castle in the French countryside. She spends her days wandering through flowery glades, capturing squirrels, hosting tea parties, bickering with her beloved and well-behaved cousin, getting underfoot in the kitchen, and generally participating in wholesome mischief.

Here you can see one of Sophie’s great passions: scaling furniture in order to put her hands into unsanctioned containers.



When she isn’t stealing bon bons, Sophie likes to join cousin Paul in fun and completely normal children’s activities such as catching flies in a paper box. Of course, being bad children of history, Sophie and Paul get in a fight over the paper box, resulting in a series of unfortunate events culminating in the release of a great swarm of flies and a single interloping bee.

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“My eyes!!!!”

Apian mishaps aside, Sophie and Paul are great companions. They go for walks, they fall off a cart, they have arts and crafts time. Here’s an illustration of their creative endeavors, right after some watercolor painting and an argument wherein Sophie threw water in Paul’s face:

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Yes, hello, despite their teeny waistcoasts and extravagant domicile, Sophie and Paul are just like children everywhere: sometimes sweet, sometimes curious, often plain old naughty.

Hambro and Zayde: A Piano Duo Like No Other

Jascha Zayde seated at the piano in the WQXR studio in the 1940s.
(WQXR Archive Collections)

For seventeen years, Leonid Hambro (1920-2006) and Jascha Zayde (1911-1999) regularly entertained WQXR audiences through their show Duo Piano Classics.  Zayde was the first staff musician hired by WQXR in 1936; the pianist, composer, and conductor told Robert Sherman in a 1986 interview that he was first paired with Clifford Herzer to form the station’s first piano duo. Their weekly collaborations became one of the station’s most popular offerings, and the four-handed studio concerts continued with Hambro replacing Herzer in 1947. You can listen to their May 17, 1951 show by clicking the “Listen” button above.

Individually and as a duo, Hambro and Zayde were busy on many other fronts as well. They produced albums together and are noted for their recording of Poulenc’s Sonata for Two Pianos. Additionally, Jascha Zayde was also the staff pianist for the New York City Ballet for more than 25 years, and also conducted the Broadway premieres of two operas by Gian Carlo Menotti: The Medium and The Telephone. After he stopped performing live on WQXR, Zayde directed the station’s educational activities and was a judge for its annual musical competitions.

Victor Borge, Sergio Franchi and Leonid Hambro from the ABC Television sepcial Victor Borge at Carnegie Hall, December 12, 1963
(Wikimedia Commons)

Meanwhile, Leonid Hambro made more than 100 recordings and toured worldwide, playing as a soloist with the orchestras of Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago and London, and was known as a gifted chamber music artist, working with Fritz Kreisler, Jascha Heifetz, Isaac Stern, Leonard Rose and Pierre Fournier. Though a longtime collaborator of Zayde’s, Hambro was probably best known for his partnership with Victor Borge. In the early 1960s, the Danish entertainer had been seeking a ‘straight man’ for his piano comedy routine; Hambro agreed to join with the musical funny man, and the two appeared regularly together on stage and television for ten years.

Real Pen Work and Exercises for Flourishing

We recently acquired a lovely volume entitled Real Pen Work: Self Instructor in Penmanship, published in 1884 by Knowles & Maxim.

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This book includes step-by-step instructions on everything from how to sit properly at your writing desk to the proper degree to which to slant letters. It features samples of script, promissory notes, verses for autograph albums, and these elegant business letters.

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There are handwriting exercises as well as exercises for flourishing, the latter of which sounds suspiciously like something one would find on a clean eating and wellness blog.

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The bulk of the book consists of illustrations made entirely through offhand flourishing, such as this graceful swan and this squiggly family (complete with curlicue guardian angel).


There’s even a small section of ornamental lettering, including some lovely color alphabets.


If you’d like to take a look at this or any of our other books on handwriting and hand-lettering, get in touch!

Welcome to the Year of Poetry: T. S. Eliot and The Waste Land

Happy Poetry Month!

This month begins FSU Libraries’ Year of Poetry, April 2018 – April 2019, an entire year of celebration dedicated to poetry in all of its forms and facets. Look out for events on campus that invite you to participate in exploring poetry creation and poetry enjoyment!

National Poetry Month is always in April, a reference to T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land*:

“April is the cruellest month, breeding

Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing

Memory and desire, stirring

Dull roots with spring rain.”

Listen to The Waste Land at Librivox.com

Eliot 1

The beautiful book pictured is from Florida State’s Special Collections. It is Eliot’s Poems, 1909-1925, a first edition of the first collection of Eliot’s poetry to include The Waste Land, a disjointed and highly allusive work that is central to modernist poetry.

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The Waste Land
Eliot 3
Spine with Label

You can find information about National Poetry Month here, including suggestions for ways to participate. Sign up for Poem-a-Day and participate in National Poem in your Pocket Day (April 26th)! 

And come to Special Collections in Strozier Library to experience some historic poetry materials in person, like Eliot’s The Waste Land!

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*Thank you, Jeff Hipsher, Service Desk Supervisor in the Scholars Commons, for this info.

Archivo Digital de la Universidad de Alicante: acceso a expedientes de represaliados

Un archivo digital de la UA permite acceder a los expedientes de 20.000 represaliados del franquismo
https://valenciaplaza.com/

27/03/2018 – ALICANTE (EFE).- La represión franquista afectó a más de 20.000 personas en la provincia de Alicante, principalmente durante los años cuarenta, según el investigador Francisco Moreno, autor de un proyecto que ha permitido diseñar un portal de la Universidad de Alicante (UA) en el que se recopilan datos de estos represaliados.

Este portal, desarrollado por el Archivo de la UA, permite acceder a los expedientes de estas víctimas de la dictadura, organizados por nombres y poblaciones, según han informado hoy fuentes de la institución académica. En él también se pueden consultar datos referidos a las acusaciones, los consejos de guerra, la vida en las prisiones y las biografías de los represaliados, y también reúne dibujos inéditos hechos por ellos durante su encarcelamiento.

La represión franquista afectó a más de 20.000 personas, sobre todo en la década de los cuarenta, que “es cuando fue más fuerte, aunque duró hasta la muerte del dictador”, según Moreno. Esta base de datos es el resultado del trabajo colaborativo en el que participan más de treinta investigadores alicantinos.

“Para llevar a cabo este portal, en el cual trabajo desde hace quince años aproximadamente, hemos bebido de tres ámbitos archivísticos, el Archivo General e Histórico de Defensa en Madrid, el Histórico Provincial de Alicante y diferentes fuentes locales, en las cuales han colaborado distintas personas para poder hacer realidad este proyecto”, ha explicado Moreno.

Hablamos de documentación parcial, porque falta mucha -por descuido o de una manera interesada- y también porque se encuentra muy descuidada, además de la carencia de fuentes alternativas para contrastar la información que es básicamente la oficial que se conserva”, ha señalado.

A pesar de todo, el portal también incluye material complementario que permite “hacernos una idea general de cómo se produjo la represión franquista en las comarcas de Alicante”, según fuentes de la UA.

En la web se pueden hallar biografías e historias de vida de algunos de los represaliados, como “José Bevià, Marina Olcina, Carmen Camaño o Josep Mengual, entre otros”, han especificado. Moreno ha destacado cómo ha sido de complicado llevar a cabo este trabajo “ingente” de documentación y recopilación de datos.

Una ardua tarea debida, por un lado, a “la desaparición de mucha documentación, como son los archivos de la Falange que Martin Villa ordenó destruir y de los cuales pocos se han salvado gracias a personas individuales”, ha revelado Moreno.

Y, por otra, a “la parcialidad de una información en la cual se atribuye toda clase de crímenes y excesos a personas que no tenían ninguna posibilidad de defenderse o con consejos de guerra a partir de informes de ayuntamientos, rectores, policía gubernativa, servicios de información militares, Guardia Civil y Falange”, ha indicado.

Los consejos de guerra derivados de la Causa General del año 1942, “un tipo de venganza del régimen”, también tienen una relevancia especial en la represión franquista, según Moreno. Ello se tradujo en juicios que tuvieron lugar “sin ninguna garantía jurídica”, derivados de informes de afectos al régimen y con información a menudo imprecisa como “afiliados a partidos de izquierda, contradictoria y descuidada”, ha asegurado. “Hablamos de documentación, sentencias e informes llenos de tantos errores que será imposible enmendarlos todos”, ha añadido.

El portal incluye la reproducción de muchos de estos informes o sentencias -señala el origen- para que se conozcan las acusaciones y las conductas por las cuales muchos de los represaliados eran condenados. En la web también se puede encontrar un apartado introductorio sobre la represión franquista en la provincia de Alicante hecho por Moreno con diferentes textos que tratan la cuestión desde una perspectiva que permite entender cómo funcionó una “represión sistemática y planificada” en Alicante.

Igualmente, se puede encontrar material creado por los reclusos republicanos en las cárceles, como cuentos e ilustraciones -en algún caso inéditas-, normalmente dedicados a sus hijos o de algún otro recluso, además de instantáneas, recortes de prensa o pinturas.

Muerte del ex jefe de la ONU Dag Hammarskjold en 1961: ¿posible asesinato?

Jefe de ONU insta por búsqueda de archivos en investigación sobre muerte de ex secretario general
http://spanish.peopledaily.com.cn

NACIONES UNIDAS, 27 mar (Xinhua) — El secretario general de las Naciones Unidas, Antonio Guterres, hizo un llamamiento este martes para que los países miembros revisen sus archivos en búsqueda de posibles evidencias sobre la muerte del ex jefe de la ONU Dag Hammarskjold en 1961.

Hammarskjold, el segundo secretario general de la ONU, junto con otras 15 personas estaban en camino a la República Democrática del Congo para buscar un cese al fuego, cuando el avión 6C-6 en el que viajaban se estrelló de repente en septiembre de 1961 en el centro de Africa.

“El secretario general llama a los Estados miembros que puedan guardar informaciones relacionadas con la investigación de Dag Hammarskjold, a designar un funcionario independiente de alto rango para realizar una revisión interna detallada de sus archivos de inteligencia, seguridad y defensa con el fin de determinar si existen informaciones concernientes”, dijo el portavoz de Guterres, Farhan Haq.

El hecho fue calificado en un principio como un accidente aéreo, pero las informaciones que se han conocido desde entonces revelan que hubo otro avión en la zona en el mismo momento del incidente, indicando la posibilidad de un ataque aéreo u otras interferencias como posible causa del incidente.

Mohamed Chande Othman, ex jefe de Justicia de Tanzania, fue designado de nuevo por Guterres para liderar la referida investigación tras una resolución emitida por la 72ª Asamblea General de la ONU.

Apagón Tecnológico: La Ciudad de Atlanta tomada por los hackers

Hackers toman como rehén al gobierno de Atlanta; piden bitcoins de rescate
http://periodicocentral.mx/



Qué pasaría si un grupo de criminales cibernéticos logran tener acceso a tu computadora?

Un grupo de hackers conocido como SamSam, podría entrar sin problemas a tu sistema. Después, ellos mismos bloquearán todos tus archivos, les cambiarán el nombre a “Lo Siento” y tendrás una semana para pagarles miles de dólares en bitcoins; si no cumples sus demandas, los pierdes para siempre.

Si eso te sucede a ti, sería muy triste perder las fotos del último acapulcazo o del bautizo de tu sobrinita, pero sería más triste perder miles de dólares. Si eso le pasa al gobierno de una de las ciudades más grandes de Estados Unidos, estamos en problemas.

En la semana pasada, el gobierno de Atlanta perdió sus archivos, sus sistemas y sus redes. Víctimas del grupo de hackers SamSam, la ciudad de 8 millones de habitantes está viviendo un apagón tecnológico.

La habitantes de Atlanta no han podido pagar el agua, ni las multas de tráfico y hay posibilidades de que sus datos están comprometidos. Los policías de la ciudad escriben sus reportes a mano y los juzgados no pueden revisar los archivos. Las oficinas gubernamentales tienen apagada hasta la impresora y el aeropuerto más activo del mundo no tiene Wi-Fi.

“Somos rehenes digitales”, dijo la alcaldesa Keisha Lance.

La ciudad de Atlanta le pidió la ayuda a expertos de Cisco y Dell para arreglar sus sistemas, pero la ciudad de Georgia todavía no sale del problemón.

Algunos expertos, dicen que pagarle a los hackers de SamSam es la mejor solución. Después de todo, para un gobierno es más fácil pagar 50 mil dólares que cubrir los costos de restauración y es preferible a mantenerte offline durante un buen rato.

Nadie sabe quiénes son los hackers de SamSam, no saben de dónde son y no saben ni cuántos conforman el equipo, pero no es la primera vez que atacan a una ciudad de Estados Unidos.

Según el New York Times, hace unos meses atacaron la Secretaría de Transporte de Colorado y ellos lograron recuperar sus archivos sin pagar nada. Una semana después, SamSam regresó con un software más potente y los dejó en ceros.

Todavía no se arregla por completo el funcionamiento digital de Atlanta —y tampoco no han pagado—, pero esta situación le ha abierto los ojos a los funcionarios públicos que intentan comprender las nuevas amenazas a un gobierno del siglo XXI.

“Hay que empezar a considerar la seguridad digital al mismo nivel que la seguridad pública”, dice un experto de información al NYT.

Mientras tanto, con las manos atadas, la alcaldesa de Atlanta, bromea diciendo que trabajar con pluma y papel ayudará a mejorar la letra de los empleados más jóvenes.


Autor: Por Sopitas / 

El nuevo Archivo General de La Nación: de carcel a Archivo

De cárcel a espacio histórico: así se transforma el expenal de Caseros en el nuevo Archivo General de la Nación
https://www.lanacion.com.ar/
Operarios trabajando en la losa del quinto piso y de fondo se ve el edificio original de la cárcel que fue declarado patrimonio porteño

                        Operarios trabajando en la losa del quinto piso y de fondo se ve el edificio original de la cárcel que fue declarado patrimonio porteño                                               Fuente: LA NACION – Crédito: Ricardo Pristupluk

LA NACION recorrió la obra , que estaría finalizada para fin de año. Más de 100 operarios preparaban los encofrados para las losas y levantaban las paredes con ladrillos ignífugos que pueden soportar hasta 120 minutos de fuego antes de colapsar. Esta y otra tecnología de última generación se aplicarán en el complejo que preserva documentos históricos del AGN, organismo que fue inaugurado en 1821.


Renders del proyecto ganador diseñado por tres arquitectos platenses
                   Renders del proyecto ganador diseñado por tres arquitectos platenses                                    Crédito: Archivo General de La Nación




La construcción tendrá 10.000 m2 en esta primera etapa del complejo diseñado por los arquitectos platenses Juliana Deschamps, Javiera Gavernet y Fabio Estremera. Más adelante contará con dos torres más y llegará a 35.000 m2 aproximadamente. De esta forma, se resolverán los problemas edilicios del actual edificio del AGN, que se encuentra ubicado en la Avenida Leandro Alem 246.


El sector de archivo, que no tendrá acceso al público será un edificio de 7 plantas con 36 espacios de almacenamiento
                  El sector de archivo, que no tendrá acceso al público será un edificio de 7 plantas con 36 espacios de almacenamiento Fuente: LA NACION – Crédito: Ricardo Pristupluk




El edificio que se está construyendo se organiza en dos cuerpos diferenciados. El primero, de dos niveles, es longitudinal con respecto a la calle Rondeau. Allí funcionarán los programas de acceso público, como las áreas de exposición, auditorio, aulas de extensión, sala de referencia y sala de consulta, así como las áreas de dirección de la institución.

Entre las obras previstas por parte del gobierno porteño está la reapartura de la calle Rondeau y y Gobierno porteño pasaría el Ministerio de Hacienda y la Administración Gubernamental de Ingresos Públicos (AGIP) a donde está la vieja carcel

Entre las obras previstas por parte del gobierno porteño está la reapartura de la calle Rondeau y y Gobierno porteño pasaría el Ministerio de Hacienda y la Administración Gubernamental de Ingresos Públicos (AGIP) a donde está la vieja carcel Fuente: LA NACION – Crédito: Ricardo Pristupluk

El cuerpo de mayor altura, ubicado longitudinalmente a la calle Pichincha, consta de siete plantas destinadas en su mayoría a las áreas de depósito de documentos y de talleres de limpieza, restauración, digitalización de documentos, y catalogación. En esta área estará vedado el acceso al público.


El edificio se encuentra en plena ejecución y la obra ya avanzó más del 60

                                 El edificio se encuentra en plena ejecución y la obra ya avanzó más del 60 Fuente: LA NACION – Crédito: Ricardo Pristupluk



En total serán 36 espacios de almacenaje que estarán repartidos entre el primer y el sexto piso. La construcción de estos locales destinados a depósitos se hace de acuerdo a parámetros de diseño que responden a la necesidad de preservar los documentos históricos que van a alojar. Por ejemplo, tienen puertas de hierro cortafuego, paredes dobles con ladrillos ignífugos y sistema seco de alarma de incendios.


El edificio contará con paredes que soportan 900 grados de calor en caso de incendios; además tendrá puertas de hierro con cortafuego

                                     El edificio contará con paredes que soportan 900 grados de calor en caso de incendios; además tendrá puertas de hierro con cortafuego                                                                                                   Fuente: LA NACION – Crédito: Ricardo Pristupluk


Ambos edificios se conectan a través de pasarelas en la planta baja y en el primer piso. El predio está pensado para levantar dos edificios de 7 pisos de iguales características al depósito actual. De esta manera, se triplicará el espacio para archivo, aunque esa parte de la obra no se hará ahora.

El nuevo complejo es construido de acuerdo a las Normas Internacionales de edificios para almacenamiento, BSP ID 5454; es un edificio inteligente, de alta tecnología y sencillo mantenimiento, con una capacidad de almacenamiento de 22.000 ml de documentación en la primera etapa
El nuevo complejo es construido de acuerdo a las Normas Internacionales de edificios para almacenamiento, BSP ID 5454; es un edificio inteligente, de alta tecnología y sencillo mantenimiento, con una capacidad de almacenamiento de 22.000 ml de documentación en la primera etapa Fuente: LA NACION – Crédito: Ricardo Pristupluk

En esta primera etapa del proyecto se trasladará la documentación que está en los depósitos de los departamentos de cine, audio y video, de fotografía y el área que denominan archivo intermedio:

Departamento de cine, audio y video: 776 ml (metros lineales)
Fotografía: 2836 ml
Archivo Intermedio: 16.000 ml

De esta manera, se logrará la unificación de todo el archivo siglo XX que actualmente está distribuido en las sedes de Paseo Colon y Benedetti. Además, el archivo intermedio tendrá condiciones adecuadas de almacenamiento, al igual que los archivos de fílmico, audio y video y de fotografía, actualmente en considerable riesgo.



En planta: el diseño del exterior busca generar espacios verdes y ser la continuidad de los parques de la zona

Autor: https://www.lanacion.com.ar/patricia-bullrich-t48176

Los datos que tiene GOOGLE sobre ti

Punto por punto: lo que Google sabe de ti sin que siquiera lo sospeches
https://mundo.sputniknews.com/
Google (imagen ilustrativa)

Últimamente los medios han divulgado la información de que Facebook podría violar las reglas de privacidad accediendo a los datos personales de los usuarios. No obstante, un experto en informática revela que Google aparentemente sabe mucho más sobre sus usuarios.

Un especialista en informáticas arrojó la luz sobre la actividad de Google luego del destape del caso Facebook y Cambridge Analytica.

Para enterarse de lo que ‘saben’ Facebook y Google, el experto irlandés Dylan Curran decidió descargar los archivos con sus datos conservados por ambos servicios. Los datos de Facebook resultaron componer un archivo de 600 Mb —lo que equivale a unos 400.000 documentos Word.

Sin embargo, esta cifra considerable empalidece a la sombra de los datos que tenía Google: alrededor de 5,5 Gb o unos tres millones documentos Word.

Curran decidió explicar en su Twitter de qué información personal puede disponer el gigante informático. Así, los servicios de Google conservan la información sobre cada lugar que visitó, cada página web que vio e incluso conserva los archivos borrados de su cuenta de Google Drive.

Qué información recoge Google

El informático contó que Google usa los dispositivos móviles para registrar en segundo plano los movimientos del usuario y hasta dispone de la información sobre cuánto tiempo duraron sus viajes de un punto a otro.

Para saber qué información tiene Google sobre sus movimientos, hagan clic aquí.

Aún más, el gigante informático tiene datos sobre aficiones y hobbies y podría calcular su posible peso y sueldo.

Además, si uno usa el calendario de Google, la empresa conserva los datos detallados de los eventos en que pensaba participar, y si llegó a hacerlo, según la posición geográfica.

Para acceder a la historia de su calendario, hace falta descargar la copia de los datos de su cuenta.

Tengan en cuenta que el archivo puede ser de gran tamaño y probablemente tardará un largo rato en descargarse.

Una vez utilizado el servicio de Google Drive, el sistema conserva todos los archivos cargados, aunque el usuario los llegue a borrar. Estos datos también están disponibles en la historia de la cuenta.

Como Google es ante todo un buscador, obviamente conserva el historial de búsqueda. Allí aparece toda la información sobre las búsquedas y hasta las imágenes descargadas y sitios visitados. Cabe destacar que todo lo que se busca en la red permanece en el sistema, aunque el usuario lo borre.

Para eliminar su historial de búsqueda por completo, hace falte borrar los datos de MyActivity en todos los dispositivos.

Además Google analiza los datos para adivinar qué le podría interesar a cierto usuario. Para ello, el sistema examina varios factores, entre ellos, la posición geográfica, el sexo y la edad.

Analizada la información, Google trata de mostrar la publicidad que podría interesar a cierto internauta. Para ver sus preferencias de publicidad, hagan clic aquí.

Google también registra la información sobre las aplicaciones que utiliza el usuario. Esto también puede incluir la información a que tienen acceso las propias aplicaciones. Es decir, si se trata de Facebook, allí puede aparecer la información sobre las conversaciones que mantiene el usuario.

Y si por ejemplo se trata de la aplicación que ayuda a regularizar el horario de sueño, Google podría saber cuándo uno se levanta y se acuesta.

La información sobre las aplicaciones utilizadas se puede consultar aquí.

Además, si utilizan Google Fit para planificar sus actividades físicas, Google puede almacenar datos sobre sus éxitos deportivos en los datos de su cuenta.

Si uno suele ver vídeos en YouTube, la historia de su búsqueda también permanece en el sistema de Google. Dicha información, a su vez, frecuentemente puede revelar mucha información sobre el usuario, como por ejemplo sus opiniones religiosas y políticas.

El historial de su actividad en YouTube está disponible aquí.

Como ya destacó el experto, Google ‘recuerda’ todas las imágenes que busca y descarga el internauta. Más que eso, aparecen conservados en el sistema las fotos sacadas por el propio usuario —incluso se sabe el lugar donde la imagen fue hecha—. La historia de sus fotos se puede conocer aquí.

Great and Good Friends: National Archives Loans Artifacts to Thai Exhibition

The National Archives played a major role in the grand opening last week of a new exhibition in Bangkok, Thailand, at the Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles. An international group effort, the exhibit—“Great and Good Friends: 200 Years of U.S.-Thai Friendship”—features more than 40 records and gifts loaned from the National Archives.

The items exchanged between Thai royalty and American Presidents—including ceremonial letters, head-of-state gifts, and an 11-foot facsimile of the 1833 U.S.-Siam Treaty—have never before been exhibited outside the United States. They will be featured among manuscripts, musical instruments, textiles, and other 19th-century artifacts loaned from the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian Institution.

Members of the Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles exhibit loan international install team pose in Bangkok, Thailand

Members of the Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles exhibit loan international install team pose in Bangkok, Thailand, on March 3, 2018. National Archives representatives are Presidential Libraries museum collections officer Kim Koons (rear, third from left) and National Archives supervisory conservator Abigail Aldrich (Photo courtesy of Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles, Bangkok, Thailand)

The “Great and Good Friends: 200 Years of U.S.-Thai Friendship” exhibit opened on March 21, 2018, at the Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles  in Bangkok, Thailand, and continues through June 30, 2018. United States Ambassador to Thailand Glyn Davies had the idea for the exhibition.

The title of the exhibit originates from the formal greeting—“Great and Good Friends”—used by U.S. Presidents in addressing the kings of Siam when contact between the two governments was limited to envoys and letters. The friendship between the nations began when an American sea captain entered the port of Bangkok and initiated an historic association between the two nations. These ceremonial gifts, on loan from the National Archives and our Presidential Libraries, reflect the continuing strong friendship of the American and Thai peoples.

We are pleased to share these and other historic treasures, and are honored to partner with the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok, Meridian International, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Queen Sirikit Museum on the ‘Great and Good Friends’ exhibit.

While many of the objects are in remarkable condition, particularly for their age, some items underwent conservation to improve their stability in preparation for display. Conservation staff at the National Archives provided professional oversight of the treatment services performed on the decorative objects, textiles, and textual items from the agency.

National Archives supervisory conservator Abigail Aldrich and senior conservator Lauren Varga share several items including a silver niello bowl

National Archives supervisory conservator Abigail Aldrich and senior conservator Lauren Varga shared several items including a silver niello bowl with gold trim given by King Prajadhipok to President Herbert Hoover in 1931. From the Collection of the U.S. National Archives, Hoover Presidential Library and Museum. (National Archives photo by Jeffrey Reed)

Other related resources within the National Archives Catalog include the daguerreotype of King Mongkut and daughter, from King Mongkut to President James Buchanan, 1861; a Siamese sword with scabbard, from King Mongkut to President James Buchanan, 1861; and a letter from King Chulalongkorn to President Theodore Roosevelt. A silver-framed photograph of King Bhumibol Adulyadej, inscribed by the King and given to President John F. Kennedy in 1963, is available to view via the online Kennedy Library catalog.

For more information on items within the exhibit from other sources, see the recent Library of Congress blog post that showcases the Library’s Thai instruments on loan. For more detailed information on the “Great and Good Friends” exhibit and a history of the relationship between the two nations, see the Great and Good Friends exhibition website.

The PIDB Welcomes New Member Alissa Starzak

The PIDB welcomes a new member, Alissa M. Starzak.  U. S. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-NY) has appointed Ms. Starzak to  a three-year term on the PIDB.  The PIDB looks forward to Ms. Starzak’s participation in continuing  work on transforming and modernizing the security classification system.  

Ms. Starzak joins PIDB from her current position at Cloudflare, a company providing web-security and optimization services.  In this position she is responsible for public policy.  Prior to joining Cloudflare, Ms. Starzak worked for the U.S government in a variety of national security positions.  Most recently, she served as the 21st General Counsel of the U.S. Department of the Army, after confirmation by the Senate. As General Counsel of the Army, she was the primary legal counsel to the Secretary of the Army and the Army’s chief legal officer.  Her appointment as Army General Counsel followed service as the Deputy General Counsel for Legislation at the U.S. Department of Defense.  As Deputy General Counsel she advised on legal issues with a legislative or congressional component, and managed an office of attorneys responsible for developing the Department of Defense legislative program.

Prior to moving to the Department of Defense, Ms. Starzak served as Counsel to the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, focusing on legal issues relating to intelligence collection and covert action, and as an Assistant General Counsel at the Central Intelligence Agency’s Office of General Counsel. She also worked in private practice in Washington, D.C., and clerked for The Honorable E. Grady Jolly, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.  She graduated from Amherst College and the University of Chicago Law School, where she served as an editor of the University of Chicago Law Review.  Ms. Starzak is serving her first term on the PIDB.

 

 

Sacrifice Your Darlings

Morgan Library in “Ballou’s,” 1855

In early 2017 I posted about 25 individual daguerreotypes from the Amherst College Class of 1850 that are part of the Archives and Special Collections. I provided new glass for each daguerreotype, reassembled each unit, and attempted to identify the members of the class. The daguerreotypes were in envelopes, having been removed in the 1980s from a grouping in an old wooden frame, which was apparently discarded. With only two exceptions – Austin Dickinson and George Gould – there were no names attached to the daguerreotypes from a class well known to Emily Dickinson, who often mentioned Austin’s classmates in her letters.  The identifications I proposed in the 2017 post were based in particular on things like a visible fraternity pin in a daguerreotype that could be compared against a list of known fraternity members, or later images of the students that could be compared with their youthful ones. In this way, it was possible to identify everyone at least tentatively. And there the matter rested.

A few months later I needed to write a thank-you note to someone who gave us a collection of daguerreotypes by Professor Ebenezer Snell’s brother William Ward Snell (the subject of a future post). For my thank-you, I looked through a collection of note cards in the department and chose my favorite, a photograph showing the interior of Morgan Library in the late 19th century.  I’ve looked at this photograph many times, but this time – with daguerreotypes on the brain – I noticed something I’d never noticed before. Can you see it?

Look closer:

I knew at once that there was a framed group of daguerreotypes on the wall.  Furthermore, it was reasonable to think it was a group of people somehow connected to each other (faculty or students) rather than a bunch of random daguerreotypes framed together (if anyone ever did that anyway). I went to a good scan of the photograph and examined it. The one on the left in the second row caught my eye — I yelped– surely that was Austin Dickinson…  I wasn’t looking for him — he just stuck out in some way, perhaps because I’ve seen his big, doughy face a million times already and I have its template impressed on my brain.

 

My more levelheaded and therefore initially skeptical colleague Chris examined it – and agreed. It then occurred to me that if this daguerreotype showed Austin, was he where he ought to be if the daguerreotypes were in alphabetical order? I counted. He was. The next thing to do was to place the ones with solid identifications in their proper place and then to work down through the list of students. Chris and I had a lot of fun with this part.

In order to do the work, we looked at the daguerreotypes that had some physical aspect that made them stand out – those that showed solarization in the whites that made them glow (like Faunce in the middle of the second row), or that were especially dark; those in which the direction the sitters were facing was a factor; or those that were framed in ovals, which seemed especially visible. These variables allowed us to put the images in place and recreate the framed group that you can see in the library photograph above. So here’s the Class of 1850 in alphabetical order, from left to right, top to bottom. If you want to be a smarty-pants, you could compare them with the identifications in the previous post and see where I was wrong.

Left to right, top to bottom:
Avery, Beebe, Bishop, Cory, Crosby, Dickinson, Ellery, Faunce, Fenn, Garrette, Gay, Gilbert, Gould, Gregory, Hodge, Howland, Manning, Newton, Nickerson, Packard, Sawyer, Shipley, Stimpson, Thompson, Williston (see list of full names at end of post). Daguerreotypist undocumented but most likely J.D. Wells of Northampton.

 

But  – oh no…!

Are you familiar with the expression “sacrifice your darlings”? I remember exactly when I first heard that expression and who said it to me. It’s usually employed (everywhere…tiresomely) as a helpful reminder to edit your writing (good advice, and I attempt to abide by it–I swear), but I also think of it in broader terms to mean giving up something one treasures.  In this case, it meant that my heart must be broken and a darling sacrificed, for it revealed that the photograph below — the same photograph that is my computer’s background– is not Henry Shipley, known to his mates as “Ship,” the brilliant bad-boy of his class who couldn’t stay out of trouble and whose tragic story (see second half of earlier post) has become linked in my mind with this particular photograph:

Instead, it’s Minott Sherman Crosby, a schoolteacher and principal of two schools, the Hartford Female Seminary and then Waterbury High School, and later superintendent of schools in Waterbury.  He lived to 1897 and had three children with Margaret Maltby Crosby.

 

An inconvenient truth. At right, Minott Crosby in “History of Waterbury”

This identification continues to disorder my mind and send up a bristling resistance. I still associate that face with Ship, though sadly now. Instead, the real Shipley is — according to the group order — this fellow:

So I put this guy – this Shipley – as the background on a second computer, where he duels across the room with his alter-ego (aka Crosby) for my affection. But I continue to struggle to accept the truth, which is a strange lesson in sacrificing a darling, and in how hard it is to give up a cherished belief in the face of better evidence — a lesson for every era.

So for now, at least, this should be it for the Class of 1850. Unless something else comes up….

 

***********************************************************************************************

Full list of the graduates of the Class of 1850:

William Fisher Avery (1826-1903)
Albert Graham Beebe (1826-1899)
Henry Walker Bishop (1829-1913)
John Edwin Cory (1825-1865)
Minott Sherman Crosby (1829-1897)
William Austin Dickinson (1829-1895)
John Graeme Ellery (1824-1855)
Daniel Worcester Faunce (1829-1911)
Thomas Legare Fenn (1830-1912)
Edmund Young Garrette (1823-1902)
Augustine Milton Gay (1827-1876)
Archibald Falconer Gilbert (1825-1866)
George Henry Gould (1827-1899)
James John Howard Gregory (1827-1910)
Leicester Porter Hodge (1828-1851)
George Howland (1824-1892)
Jacob Merrill Manning (1824-1882)
Jeremiah Lemuel Newton (1824-1883)
Joseph Nickerson (1828-1882)
David Temple Packard (1824-1880)
Sylvester John Sawyer (1823-1884)
Henry Shipley (1825-1859)
Thomas Morrill Stimpson (1827-1898)
John Howland Thompson (1827-1891)
Lyman Richards Williston (1830-1897)

There were also 15 non-graduates in the class, all of whom departed Amherst long before the daguerreotypes were made.

 

Pepper’s Work in Lowering Hearing Aid Costs

Recently, while engaging in a record survey project involving the Claude Pepper papers,  I discovered Pepper’s influential work in lowering hearing aid costs to improve affordability and strengthen precise hearing loss screenings among seniors.

pepper-hearing-aid-correspondence.jpeg

Senator Claude Pepper was perhaps the first politician to grasp the burdens of older Americans owning hearing aids. In fact, many people that were 65 and older during his congressional service either couldn’t afford hearing aids, because their insurance didn’t cover the cost, or they were exposed to fraudulent tactics to purchase them. As sellers created the illusion that hearing aids could either physically cure hearing loss or prosthetically correct hearing loss to a state of normalcy. And, in some cases, older adults fell victim to purchasing two hearing aids for both ears when only one was necessary due to a faulty diagnosis. As a result, Claude Pepper took great pride in building awareness about hearing aids and affordability by introducing the H.R. 646 Bill on January 15, 1979, to propose a supplementary medical insurance program to aid in covering hearing aid costs and safeguard consumer abuse. The bill also pushed for hearing aid manufacturers to advertise that hearing aids could not cure or impede hearing impairments. The bill demanded that the Food and Drug Administration mandate the requirement of an audiologist examination before purchasing hearing aids under the Medicare program to secure accurate treatment. Senator Pepper fought hard for this great cause, even though Congress later decided to reject the bill.

If you would like to learn more about Claude Pepper’s work regarding hearing aid legislation, please visit the Claude Pepper Library & Museum. Materials are available for researchers and can be discovered online through the collection’s finding aid.

Scotland House events at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games

The University of Stirling Archives is delighted to be presenting Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions, our specially curated display looking at the history of Scotland’s participation in the four previous Commonwealth Games held in Australia, at Scotland House, Team Scotland’s HQ during the 2018 Gold Coast Games. The exhibition will be on display daily from Monday 2 to Friday 6 April at the Mantra On View Hotel, Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast. Our exhibition team will be on site to provide further information about the exhibition and our work with the Commonwealth Games Scotland Archive. For more information, or to arrange a visit, please contact Karl Magee, our University Archivist, at karl.magee@stir.ac.uk

There will also be a number of events related to the exhibition during the week.

Tuesday 3 April, 11.00-12.00:

Tour and talk for members of the Australian Society of Archivists

The University of Stirling Archives invites members of the Australian Society of Archivists to a private view of the exhibition Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions. This Australian-themed version of our touring Hosts and Champions exhibition was specially commissioned for the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games for display at Scotland House, the headquarters for Team Scotland during the competition. Karl Magee, the University of Stirling Archivist, will provide a tour of the exhibits and a talk on the development of the touring exhibition and the challenges of bringing it to Gold Coast. For further information, or to book a place, please contact Denise Stephenson, Secretary, Queensland Branch, ASA, at Denise.Stephenson@calvarycc.qld.edu.au

Wednesday 4 April, 12.30-13.30:

Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions: a look at Scotland’s proud Games history ‘Down Under’

With Gold Coast 2018 Australia’s fifth time hosting the Commonwealth Games, Jon Doig (CEO Commonwealth Games Scotland) will turn back the clock to Perth 1962, Brisbane 1982 and Melbourne 2006 with a panel of past athletes as they share their experiences and explore the similarities and differences of competing for Team Scotland over a 40 year span. Further information can be found on Team Scotland’s Scotland House page.

Wednesday 4 April, 18.30-: 

Live coverage of 2018 Commonwealth Games opening ceremony (with free Irn-Bru and Tunnocks tea cakes!)

Friday 6 April, 18.00-20.00:

Stirling University Alumni event

Join Karl Magee (University Archivist) and Prof Richard Haynes (Arts & Humanities) for a private view of Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions and find out more about how the university is working with Commonwealth Games Scotland to protect and preserve its sporting heritage. If you would like to book a place at this event please email: Jennifer.Forman@stir.ac.uk

Our University Archivist Karl Magee & Prof Richard Haynes (Arts & Humanities) will be at Scotland House to provide tours of the exhibition.

Scotland House events at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games

The University of Stirling Archives is delighted to be presenting Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions, our specially curated display looking at the history of Scotland’s participation in the four previous Commonwealth Games held in Australia, at Scotland House, Team Scotland’s HQ during the 2018 Gold Coast Games. The exhibition will be on display daily from Monday 2 to Friday 6 April at the Mantra On View Hotel, Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast. Our exhibition team will be on site to provide further information about the exhibition and our work with the Commonwealth Games Scotland Archive. For more information, or to arrange a visit, please contact Karl Magee, our University Archivist, at karl.magee@stir.ac.uk

There will also be a number of events related to the exhibition during the week.

Tuesday 3 April, 11.00-12.00:

Tour and talk for members of the Australian Society of Archivists

The University of Stirling Archives invites members of the Australian Society of Archivists to a private view of the exhibition Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions. This Australian-themed version of our touring Hosts and Champions exhibition was specially commissioned for the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games for display at Scotland House, the headquarters for Team Scotland during the competition. Karl Magee, the University of Stirling Archivist, will provide a tour of the exhibits and a talk on the development of the touring exhibition and the challenges of bringing it to Gold Coast. For further information, or to book a place, please contact Denise Stephenson, Secretary, Queensland Branch, ASA, at Denise.Stephenson@calvarycc.qld.edu.au

Wednesday 4 April, 12.30-13.30:

Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions: a look at Scotland’s proud Games history ‘Down Under’

With Gold Coast 2018 Australia’s fifth time hosting the Commonwealth Games, Jon Doig (CEO Commonwealth Games Scotland) will turn back the clock to Perth 1962, Brisbane 1982 and Melbourne 2006 with a panel of past athletes as they share their experiences and explore the similarities and differences of competing for Team Scotland over a 40 year span. Further information can be found on Team Scotland’s Scotland House page.

Wednesday 4 April, 18.30-: 

Live coverage of 2018 Commonwealth Games opening ceremony (with free Irn-Bru and Tunnocks tea cakes!)

Friday 6 April, 18.00-20.00:

Stirling University Alumni event

Join Karl Magee (University Archivist) and Prof Richard Haynes (Arts & Humanities) for a private view of Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions and find out more about how the university is working with Commonwealth Games Scotland to protect and preserve its sporting heritage. If you would like to book a place at this event please email: Jennifer.Forman@stir.ac.uk

Our University Archivist Karl Magee & Prof Richard Haynes (Arts & Humanities) will be at Scotland House to provide tours of the exhibition.

The Journals of an 19th century Tallahassee Reverend

We recently added a small new set of materials to the digital collection for theSt. John’s Episcopal Church Records. Two items detail the history of the Church further. The other three are journals kept by the Reverend Doctor W.H. Carter. They document his travels and ministry in New York, Florida, and places in-between from 1855-1907. Dr. Carter was born in Brooklyn, New York, and studied at Yale University. Before his time in Tallahassee, Carter was rector of Episcopal congregations in Warwick, New York, and Daytona Beach. After some time spent traveling as a missionary, Carter was installed at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Tallahassee in June 1879. In his journal entry from June 9th, Carter noted: “wonder how I will like it.” He apparently liked it well enough, as he remained in Tallahassee until his death in 1907.

Page from Journal of W.H. Carter, 1874-1897
The page from Rev. Carter’s Journal where he notes his move to Tallahassee in 1879. [See Original Item]

During his time in Tallahassee, Carter oversaw the construction of a new church building in 1880 and continued to take his clerical work on the road to worshippers in many small towns in North Florida, asylums, and the Leon County Jail. In the 1880s he was instrumental in establishing a church building and school for the black congregation of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Tallahassee, often performing services there. Carter’s work and demeanor left a significant impression on the congregation of St. John’s; his obituary notes that “Doctor Carter’s life was an object lesson of cheerful and patient serenity. In 1950 the church annex was extensively renovated and renamed the Carter Chapel in his honor. You may see all the journals here in the digital collection as well as the other materials digitized from the St. John’s Episcopal Church Records collection.

St. John’s is the mother church of the Diocese of Florida. It was founded as a mission parish in 1829, and the church’s first building was erected in 1837. The Diocese was organized at St. John’s in 1838 and Francis Huger Rutledge, who became rector of St. John’s in 1845, was consecrated the first Bishop of Florida in 1851. The original church burned in 1879; a new church was built on the same site and consecrated in 1888, and it is still the parish’s principal place of worship.

The physical collection includes administrative records; member registries; meeting minutes of the Vestry and church circles; Bibles, Books of Common Prayer, hymnals, and other liturgical works; documentation of the history of St. John’s Church and the Episcopal Diocese of Florida; service bulletins and other periodicals; sermon transcripts; photographs; and motion pictures.

For more information about the collection, visit its finding aid.

Sources:
W.H. Carter Journal, 1874-1897, St. John’s Episcopal Church Records, Special Collections and Archives, Florida State University Libraries, Tallahassee, Florida. http://purl.fcla.edu/fsu/MSS_2016-006
Stauffer, Carl. (1984). God willing: A history of St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1829-1979. Tallahassee, FL. http://fsu.catalog.fcla.edu/permalink.jsp?23FS021651363

Making Sunshine: The Work of the Public Interest Declassification Board

The PIDB continues its role advising the President, Executive Branch officials, and Congress on ways to bring sunshine to the security classification system in the interest of our national security.  During Sunshine Week, we want to share our plans for a new report and series of recommendations we believe will transform the security classification system from its antiquated, overburdened state to a modernized system capable of functioning in the digital age.

The PIDB, forming a Declassification Technology Working Group in 2015, began conversations with government technology and information officers and experts to hear of concerns and needs in the classification and declassification frontlines. Through these exchanges and findings, we reiterate our long-held recommendation that modernization of the classification system is a critical imperative.  Earnest and real attempts must be made to ensure a transparent and credible security classification system by reducing over-classification and improving declassification to sustain our democratic values and citizenry from an antiquated, overburdened system.

We know the new era must be met with a bold vision, a vision that clearly and systematically surveys the future of classification and declassification for the twenty-first century. In the next few weeks we will engage with our public and government stakeholders to share a draft report titled:  A Vision for the Digital Age: Modernization of the U.S. National Security Classification and Declassification System.  We will seek comments and feedback on the draft Report from our stakeholders before finalizing the recommendations and presenting to the President.

The vision we provide is for a uniform, integrated and modernized security classification system sustainable in the digital environment that appropriately protects national security interests and instills confidence in the American people. The declassification business model for the future centers on (1) organizing for success via a more unified and federated enterprise-level system-of-systems approach to records declassification and (2) the acquisition and adoption of technologies and processes that leverage information age IT and telecommunications innovation and systems development.

Our draft Report will be open to thoughtful appraisal from our stakeholders. Please remain engaged with the PIDB blog to hear more about the PIDB’s newest recommendations and to participate in the finalization of our next Report to the President.

Hosts & Champions: taking the Commonwealth Games Scotland Archive on tour

The 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games begin on 4 April with a spectacular opening ceremony at Carrara Stadium, the 5th time Australia has hosted the competition. To coincide with this fortnight of sporting competition our touring Hosts and Champions exhibition is going back on the road, celebrating the history of Scotland’s participation and achievement in the Commonwealth Games.

In a first for the University Archives we will be presenting two simultaneous versions of the exhibition 10,000 miles apart during the Games, visiting Hawick Museum in the Scottish Borders and Scotland House, the headquarters for Team Scotland, in the Gold Coast.

In April 2018 two versions of our Hosts & Champions exhibition will be on display in Hawick in the Scottish Borders and at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

The exhibition at Hawick Museum opens on Thursday 29 March and will focus on the Games hosted by Scotland in Edinburgh in 1970 and 1986, and Glasgow in 2014. A new display entitled Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions has been created for the Gold Coast Games which looks at Scotland’s previous visits to compete in Australia in Sydney in 1938, Perth in 1962, Brisbane in 1982 and Melbourne in 2006. It will be on display at Scotland House (located in the Mantra On View Hotel, Surfers Paradise) from Monday 2 to Friday 6 April.

A range of tours, talks and events are being planned to coincide with the exhibitions with regular updates being posted on Twitter using #HostsandChampions.

Hosts & Champions: taking the Commonwealth Games Scotland Archive on tour

The 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games begin on 4 April with a spectacular opening ceremony at Carrara Stadium, the 5th time Australia has hosted the competition. To coincide with this fortnight of sporting competition our touring Hosts and Champions exhibition is going back on the road, celebrating the history of Scotland’s participation and achievement in the Commonwealth Games.

In a first for the University Archives we will be presenting two simultaneous versions of the exhibition 10,000 miles apart during the Games, visiting Hawick Museum in the Scottish Borders and Scotland House, the headquarters for Team Scotland, in the Gold Coast.

In April 2018 two versions of our Hosts & Champions exhibition will be on display in Hawick in the Scottish Borders and at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

The exhibition at Hawick Museum opens on Thursday 29 March and will focus on the Games hosted by Scotland in Edinburgh in 1970 and 1986, and Glasgow in 2014. A new display entitled Aussie Hosts and Tartan Champions has been created for the Gold Coast Games which looks at Scotland’s previous visits to compete in Australia in Sydney in 1938, Perth in 1962, Brisbane in 1982 and Melbourne in 2006. It will be on display at Scotland House (located in the Mantra On View Hotel, Surfers Paradise) from Monday 2 to Friday 6 April.

A range of tours, talks and events are being planned to coincide with the exhibitions with regular updates being posted on Twitter using #HostsandChampions.

Upcoming Cultural Events

Thanks to all who attended the HairBrained opening party on February 28th; it was a delightful evening! Remember to check the Library’s website for up-to-date information about upcoming hair-themed programming, and to pass through the Rhode Island Room on your next visit to PPL to view our exhibition.

Speaking of programming, we want to share information about two upcoming events in Providence that may be of interest to our fair blog readers:

Latinos in Heritage Conservation/ Rhode Island Statewide Historic Preservation Conference
Thursday-Saturday, April 26-28, 2018
Various locations throughout Providence
Registration required; register here before April 17.

Latinos in Heritage Conservation, Rhode Island Latino Arts, and the Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission are proud to present Encuentro 2018. Spanning three full days of programs in Providence and the Blackstone Valley, this groundbreaking event brings together the 3rd National Convening of Latinos in Heritage Conservation and the 33rd Annual Statewide Rhode Island Historic Preservation Conference.

Featuring guest speakers from across the country and opportunities to meet and exchange ideas with fellow practitioners and advocates for Latino historic preservation, this is a not to be missed opportunity. Rhode Island Latino Arts, RIHPHC, and local partners have planned an engaging program of tours and special events to round out the schedule.

RISD unbound Art Book Fair
Saturday, April 7, 2018
Fleet Library at the Rhode Island School of Design
15 Westminster Street, Providence, RI
Free and open to the public

This day-long event celebrates artists’ books, zines, and experimental printed matter created by RISD students and local artists, designers, and publishers. Through exhibits, sales, and discussions, RISD unbound seeks to inspire unbound conversations around cultural publishing in the Providence community.

 

 

Finding Angel de Cora

I have spent a lot of time digging a little deeper into our Native American Literature Collections in preparation for the Rare Book School course I will be co-teaching this summer: A History of Native American Books & Indigenous Sovereignty. I was already aware of Angel de Cora(Winnebago) and her work as a book designer and illustrator, and I knew she went to school at Smith, but not much more than that.

Middle Five Cover

Francis LaFlesche. The Middle Five. Cover design by Angel de Cora.

My Rare Book School co-conspirator, Amherst Professor Kiara Vigil, told me to read this book, which includes a whole chapter on de Cora:

Hutchinson’s book fleshes out the broader context in which de Cora was working, and she identifies other examples of de Cora’s commercial illustration work. Learning that de Cora attended The Drexel Institute of Art in Philadelphia where she studied under famed American illustrator Howard Pyle helped to place de Cora within the mainstream of commercial illustration work in the 1890s. Two of her earliest known published works fit neatly within the pages of Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, which was aimed at the rising American middle class consumer. Her first story, “The Sick Child,” appeared in the February 1899 issue:

The Sick Child

A second illustrated story appeared in the November 1899 issue of the same title: “Gray Wolf’s Daughter”:

Gray Wolfs Daughter

Chronologically, de Cora’s illustrations and designs for The Middle Five followed in 1900. In addition to the cover shown above, de Cora produced a color image for the frontispiece, with her signature clearly visible at the bottom:

asc-402764

Before reading Hutchinson’s book, I was not aware that de Cora took a job at the Carlisle Indian School — a boarding school for Native American students in Pennsylvania — where she taught art for several years. While at Carlisle, she also helped launch a new magazine called The Indian Craftsman, a reference to Gustav Stickley’s arts and crafts movement magazine, The Craftsman. Although Amherst College does not hold any original issues of The Indian Craftsman, there are several available through the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center:

Indian Craftsman

As soon as I learned of this magazine, and others produced at Carlisle, I began searching for more information about printing projects at Carlisle and other Native boarding schools. As luck would have it, a book appeared last year on that very subject: Recovering Native American Writings in the Boarding School Press (Edited by Jacqueline Emery).

More than simply a working artist who incorporated her Native heritage into her work, de Cora was attempting to develop a pan-Indian aesthetic that blended her formal training and Native traditions.

Food and Drink: New Video Wall Show

Over the past several years, five video wall shows centering on various themes have been created at the Archives. Titles include Vancouver Vignettes, Games in the City, Edifice, Forces Shaping a City, and Parks. The video wall shows highlight the diverse nature of our photograph, video, and textual holdings.

One of the photographs included in the video wall show. Fishing on Greer’s (now Kitsilano) Beach, 1890s. Reference code: AM54-S4-: Be P142

It has been a few years since the last video wall show, Parks, was created, so we felt it was time to add another one to our rotating shows. We are happy to announce the latest show: Food and Drink: Growing, making, buying and consuming.

The inspiration for this latest installation was two-fold. As an undergraduate, I studied horticulture and agriculture, and therefore the production and consumption of food and beverages are never far from my mind. Secondly, in my daily work at the Archives, I constantly come across a wealth of materials relating to the production and consumption of food and beverages in and around Vancouver throughout the last 150 or so years.

A photograph included under the Making and Processing Food section of the new video wall. Interior of the National Biscuit Company, 1931. Reference code: AM1535-: CVA 99-3983

The creation of a video wall show is a lengthy process which requires a fair amount of researching materials and refining the theme’s framework. However, it is a very satisfying process that has provided me with an opportunity to be creative all the while increasing my knowledge of our collection and the history of Vancouver, something that always comes in handy when assisting our researchers.

Another image featured in the new video wall show. Children drinking milk in classroom at Open Air School, ca.1926. Reference code: AM1376-: CVA 96-2

The video wall show starts with the raising and growing of food, then transitions to the making and processing of food and beverages, the buying of food, and finishes with photographs related to the consumption of food and beverages. The video wall shows can be viewed at the Archives in our gallery space, or in the City Hall rotunda across from the elevators. You can also view it on YouTube.

Celebrating Information Access: Sunshine Week 2018

Sunshine Week is an annual nationwide celebration of access to public information. It was  launched more than a decade ago by the American Society of News Editors, and is embraced by journalists, librarians, concerned citizens, civil society organizations, elected officials, and government employees as an opportunity to discuss the importance of open government and its impact.

Sunshine Week 2018 logo
The National Archives and Records Administration will host several events in observance of Sunshine Week. Events include an educational symposium, a week-long transcription challenge engaging citizen archivists, and a panel discussion. Sunshine Week allows the National Archives to highlight how it is a leader in open government.

Sunshine Week 2018 at the National Archives will begin with a special program on Monday, March 12, 2018, at 1 p.m. in the William G. McGowan Theater in Washington, DC. Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont will offer the keynote address entitled “Championing The Public’s Right to Know.”  Several breakout sessions featuring government leaders and experts will focus on innovation in the Federal Government, congressional digital engagement, and open data.

Throughout Sunshine Week, the National Archives will also sponsor a special citizen archivist mission focusing on transcription of the Pentagon Papers, starting on March 12. The Citizen Archivist Dashboard offers more information on how to engage in the transcription challenge.    

To round out the Sunshine Week events, the National Archives will host a panel discussion entitled “Access and Transparency—Records Held at the National Archives” on March 14, 2018, at 2 p.m. in the William G. McGowan Theater in Washington, DC. The program focuses on how to request and access the restricted and non-restricted Federal records held at the National Archives. The panel of staff experts will discuss and answer questions about their work in making records available from our executive, legislative, and Presidential holdings.

The National Archives Sunshine Week events are free and open to the public, but registration is required for the March 12 event. The program will also be available via livestream from the National Archives YouTube Channel.

Learn more and find the full program of events on the FOIA Ombudsman blog.

Solidifying U.S.-Czech Relations

“Dobrý den!” Or, as we in the Czech Republic say, “hello!” Over the past few months, I have been working on creating a container list for the Talbot “Sandy” D’Alemberte Collection. Talbot “Sandy” D’Alemberte, a Tallahassee native, is a lawyer, professor, and former President of FSU. A former President of the American Bar Association, Sandy is well known throughout the legal world and has made important contributions in promoting equality and democracy. Special Collections & Archives received these materials recently, and it has been my job to help organize and categorize all of the materials in the collection. Despite the preponderance of legal files, case briefs, and writs of certiorari, there have been a few interesting finds in the collection.

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In particular, I am intrigued by Sandy’s connections with the American Friends of the Czech Republic, a group designed to increase relations between the United States and the Czech Republic. Sandy was a board member of the group and oversaw the erection of a statue of T.G. Masaryk, who was the first president of the now extant country of Czechoslovakia. Most of the materials pertaining to Sandy in this part of the collection are site proposal documents and information on the Resource Development Committee of the American Friends of the Czech Republic. I find this particular part of the collection interesting for two reasons: first, given that my family heritage stems from Slovakia in a tiny town near the Czech Republic, it is always wonderful to pour over and analyze information from my ancestral homeland; second, and more importantly, Sandy’s work with the American Friends of the Czech Republic reifies his overall drive to be amicable, and most of all, helpful. This notion is further peppered throughout the entirety of the collection, particularly in his extensive and lengthy list of Pro Bono hours and in his service in and on multiple commissions, organizations, and commissions designed to improve access to education and to basic, fundamental resources.

Further, I believe that this part of the collection comments on a common undercurrent of the D’Alemberte Collection, that is, that despite our differences, we, as a human race, are profoundly more similar than we might believe. Ultimately, I am quite honored to be working on this collection and to have come to know, vicariously, such a reputable member of the FSU community.

Post by David Advent. Advent,  a native of Western North Carolina, is a junior English Literature and International Affairs double major at FSU. He is currently conducting his Honors in the Major Thesis and holds numerous campus positions that promote the visibility of undergraduate research at FSU.

Make Access Happen

The National Archives and Records Administration has been able to accomplish some incredible digitization and outreach work over the years due in part to contributions and support by anonymous donors and the National Archives Foundation. Two examples of this are the World War I Wartime Films project, and the Ratified Indian Treaties vault digitization project.

Wartime Films: World War I
The digitization of WWI-era material, much of it never-before-seen by the public, was made possible through the generosity of an anonymous donor. This digitization effort included over 100,000 photographs and several hundred reels of film originally shot by the US Signal Corps on behalf of various armed forces units in the 1914–1920 timeframe. All material digitized is now available online in electronic format the National Archives Catalog.

Women's machine gun squad police reserves, New York City

Women’s machine gun squad police reserves, New York City. National Archives Identifier 31474833

To better engage and connect our audiences to this extensive collection of World War I resources, NARA developed the Remembering WWI mobile app. This app provides users with a way to interact with the content and was designed for a target user group of teachers, museum professionals, and digital humanities scholars. We wanted to reach teachers in hopes that the app could enhance lessons on WWI in the classroom, museums to reuse NARA’s WWI materials to enrich the narrative around their own local WWI collections and exhibits, and humanities scholars so they can utilize and reuse the metadata that were generated from this content.

We were recently informed by James Theres (Filmmaker, Producer, and Director) that he helped to produce new documentary called “The Hello Girls” which reuses much of our still images and silent films for his documentary.

NARA was fortunate to lead this national collaborative effort with participation from the Library of Congress and National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution – National Museum of American History, the WWI Centennial Commission, the American Association of State and Local History, and the National WWI Museum and Memorial. This collaboration will ensure our audiences are connected to an extensive collection of resources to further provide an enriched experience with the app.

Vault Digitization: Ratified Indian Treaties
Some NARA holdings are so historically significant and valuable that they are separated from our normal holdings and stored in vaults to increase security and limit physical access. Vault materials at our Washington DC location are among the most sensitive records in NARA’s collection: these records are not served to the public. Many of these records have not been digitized and are therefore effectively closed to the public.

With support from an anonymous donor and the National Archives Foundation, NARA is embarking on an effort to digitize the set of Ratified Indian Treaties from our vault holdings (377 treaties in all). NARA will perform much needed conservation work on these materials and digitize the entire contents of the file for each treaty. This will include scanning the Treaties themselves along with accompanying papers: the Presidential Proclamations, and the Resolutions of Ratification by Senate. We will finally be able to provide public access electronically to these materials on our National Archives Catalog. Having this content available publically further compliments NARA’s existing education efforts around the treaties and other Native American records.

Sample image from the Ratified Indian Treaty 133: Arikara (Ricara) - Arikara Village, July 18, 1825

Sample image from the Ratified Indian Treaty 133: Arikara (Ricara) – Arikara Village, July 18, 1825. National Archives Identifier 57698865

Sample image from the Ratified Indian Treaty 360: Sioux (Sisseton [Sissiton], Wahpeton [Warpeton]) - Washington, DC, 1867.

Sample image from the Ratified Indian Treaty 360: Sioux (Sisseton [Sissiton], Wahpeton [Warpeton]) – Washington, DC, 1867. National Archives Identifier 58234673

We are also working closely with the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in support of their Nation to Nation exhibit. Starting in 2014 and rotating every 6 months, NMAI is displaying a new treaty to be exhibited to the public. Most recently, the Treaty of 1868 with the Navajo was installed on February 20th and will be on display at NMAI until May. It will then be on loan to the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock Arizona in time to commemorate the 150th anniversary of its signing.

Sample Image from the Treaty between the United States Government and the Navajo Indians Signed at Fort Sumner, New Mexico Territory on June 1, 1868

Sample Image from the Treaty between the United States Government and the Navajo Indians Signed at Fort Sumner, New Mexico Territory on June 1, 1868. National Archives Identifier 6173067

Our efforts in digitization are an important piece in achieving our strategic goal to Make Access Happen. Through these generous gifts, we are able to expand our digitization and online access efforts to make these public domain records more accessible for everyone to use, from teachers and local community groups, to museums and filmmakers.

Take Me Out To the Ball Game…

In Florida, it’s easy to see how it’s baseball season. We’re coming out an unusually warm February (though more seasonably cool and rainy weather is headed our way). So, it came as no surprise that the college baseball season is already in full swing. The 2018 Noles are riding a winning streak going into the second month of the season, having won their first 8 games of the season. Perhaps they’ve been perusing our collection of media guides from past teams for inspiration in the offseason.

Cover from the 1986 Florida State Baseball Media Guide
Cover from the 1986 Florida State Baseball Media Guide [see original object]

FSU has the dubious honor of being the most successful collegiate baseball program in the United States without a College World Series championship to their name. Maybe this will be their year? We wish them luck!

Browse our entire collection of sports media guides for FSU athletics here and if you have some you see we’re missing, let us know! We’d love to complete our collection.

Journeys in the Shaw Collection: Bohemian Grove Plays

The Green Knight

FSU’s John M. Shaw Childhood in Poetry Collection is vast and covers myriad topics. While most are books intended for children, or books containing poetry, or both, in many cases the texts deviate from the collection’s title altogether.

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The cover’s gold medallion

Such is the case with The Green Knight: A Vision. In a catalog search for children’s books about knights, I stumbled upon a work that, with a little research, unraveled into a fascinating story about powerful men meeting in the woods in secret. The book is tan with a white spine and a gold medallion on the front cover depicting two knights astride their horses in the middle of a joust.

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The Naked Man

 

The Naked Man

The first sign that the text might not be intended for children was this strange photograph, labeled “NEOTIOS.”

It is a naked man, from a distance. Though the photograph is pasted into a position clearly made for it – the name of the photograph and artist are printed in the space below the paste-in spot – it is a strange sight opposite the elaborate title page, with its wood-block border and inclusion of green ink.

Frontispiece
The Frontispiece

 

 

It is on this frontispiece that The Green Knight’s origin is identified: “PRIVATELY PRINTED FOR THE BOHEMIAN CLUB BY SOME OF ITS MEMBERS / SAN FRANCISCO: MCMXI.” The border incorporates the primary values of the Bohemian ideal in the four great arts: Music, Literature, Painting, and Sculpture. Nature and Bohemia are at the top, and Care, the personified troubles and worries of the world, is at the bottom and depicted as a skull. (The Bohemian Club famously burns Care in effigy at a secret ceremony during their time at the Bohemian Grove.)

 

 

Weaving Spiders

Colophon
Colophon

The Bohemian Club is a private club (still active) founded in 1872 in San Francisco. The club began in order to gather together creatives in a sort of “salon” setting, but eventually included influential businessmen and politicians who considered themselves art aficionados. It is perhaps more accurate to say that they were aficionados in so far as they had the resources and leisure to enjoy and own art at a level beyond that of the everyman. The club’s motto is “Weaving spiders come not here,” meant to indicate that the wheeling and dealing of business should be left outside the walls of the club, where the conversation should turn to loftier things like art, music, and literature. However, it is undeniably a community of movers and shakers, and membership rosters read like a who’s-who of the era.

 

“Oscar Wilde, upon visiting the club in 1882, is reported to have said “I never saw so many well-dressed, well-fed, business-looking Bohemians in my life.” (Wikipedia)

Bohemian Grove

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Neotios’ Costume

Each summer, the Bohemian Club gathers in a second location outside of the city, among the redwoods of Monte Rio, California in what came to be called The Bohemian Grove. Here, global leaders purportedly “rough it” in the woods, but from accounts, it seems that the modern concept of “glamping” (glamorous camping) is a more appropriate description.

 

During the final weekend of a three-week stay in the Bohemian Grove, an elaborate play is performed: the Grove Play. It is written and staged entirely by club members. The Green Knight: A Vision is one of these plays, performed only once in the forest of the Bohemian Grove and recorded in this book that was meant only for the eyes of its members. The picture of the naked man is a character in the play, Neotios, whose proposed costume is depicted in the book.

Grove Plays always incorporate a musical component, and The Green Knight includes the composed music, which is primarily instrumental and meant to break up the sections of speech. There are a few chanted portions, highlighting the ritualesque nature of the performance.

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Music from The Green Knight

The Sire

The book includes an introduction by the “sire” (author) Porter Garnett, the play text, costume designs, music, and a fold-out map of the natural stage: a hillside faced by log benches for the spectators. It is this hillside that is depicted in the photograph of Neotios. The Bohemian Grove performances aspired to a level of artistic excellence that was unsurpassed outside of the private gatherings. Porter Garnett argued that “a certain number of the audience – by reason of their possession or their apprehension of it – feel that they are participants in a rite, not spectators at an entertainment” (The Bohemian Jinks ix).

Map
Map of the Grove Stage, logs for seating on the right side

Plays performed by Bohemian Grove members were referred to as “jinks,” and other copies of “Summer Jinks” exist, even here at FSU. The Allen Music Library holds a copy of “The Atonement of Pan: A Music Drama” from 1912, and Special Collections has Truth: A Grove Play from 1926 in its vault.

Truth
Truth

For further reading on the Bohemian Grove, this Vanity Fair article is a fascinating introduction.


SOURCES:

Garnett, Porter. The Bohemian Jinks : A Treatise. San Francisco : Bohemian Club, 1908., 1908.

Garnett, Porter and Edward Griffith Stricklen. The Green Knight : A Vision. San Francisco, Priv. print. for the Bohemian club, by some of its members, 1911.

Hadley, Henry and Joseph D. Redding. The Atonement of Pan : A Music Drama. [San Francisco, Calif. : Bohemian Club], 1912.

Sterling, George and Domenico Brescia. Truth : A Grove Play. San Francisco : Bohemian Club, 1926.

 

HairBrained Kickoff Party

In case you haven’t heard, tomorrow (Wednesday, February 28, 2018) is the kickoff party for our 2018 exhibition and program series, HairBrained! The event runs from 6:00-8:00 here at the library, and will feature curators’ tours of the exhibition, an interactive performance from our Creative Fellow Becci Davis, and a performance by Sussy Santana and Orlando Hernández. The opening is also a great chance to get a copy of our exhibition catalog, which features color photos of exhibition items alongside hair-themed poetry by Sussy Santana.

HairBrained

We’re excited that opening day is nearly here. We’ve spent months carefully selecting items, researching everything from ancient Egyptian wigs to the history of the hooded hair dryer, building a fleet of custom book supports, and printing labels.

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These book supports are made of black, acid-free matboard that is cut to the measurements of each item in the exhibition.

Meanwhile, our Director of Programs and Exhibitions has been planning a fantastic series of hair-themed programs to take place at the library during the upcoming months. You can see a list of upcoming programs on the PPL website.